01 December 2007

2008 Lebanon New Year Countdown Starts

You may have noticed the decrease in posts in the recent days... just hated to repeat the events over and over and over. People are just fed-up from hearing about elections being postponed once, twice, third time, fourth time, fifth time etc... Now  it is set till December 7! I thought I had to put that in perspective adding to it one year memory of the tents in down-town Beirut. Some are celebrating.... I don't know why!But it sure doesn't look smart as no one sees any achievement in that.

The army chief is now an added runner to the presidential elections.

As many prominent Lebanese politicians and leaders we are no more optimistic about the current situation in Lebanon. Many have left, some have been out since four month as they expect escalations around the clock. Luckily no recent assassination in the area which might put you at ease or even might stress the unsolved dilemma situation. These are still holding to their down-side opinion and expect the worse to come! Politics is a dirty m***f***...you cannot trust!

No one knows anymore what 14 wants or 8! Suddenly, Aoun might turn the table upside down, or even Sayyid can turn the whole area upside-down... while poor Hariri is roaming from US to France to KSA to etc... not knowing what he wants just asking for support. What kind of support is exactly needed here? for the Hariri family or the Sunnis or for Lebanon?

Well,
-If it was for the Sunnis, we would have seen a proper alliance between all Sunnis in Lebanon, as Hariri do not represent all the Sunnis in Lebanon, even if he claims to. Collecting votes with all kind of means might get you the chair, but soon you'll loose face. It is an eccentric strange fact of alliance between Hariri and GeaGea!!! the latter being a former prisoner of war, where he committed crimes and assassinations against Muslims and Christians!
Hariri was not in Lebanon at times, so he totally do not understand and feel it, as he was probably at school in France! If 14 cannot see that, all others can!

-If it was for Lebanon, the Prime Minister would have held a Lebanese stand with all Lebanese people. You cannot just support the resistance at one stage and reject it after six months! This makes the government look stupid and incredible. If you cannot run it from the inside, you can not even dream of running it from the outside... so I suggest to come back to senses and stay put in Lebanon near the locals who are suffering day and night from slumping economy to cost of living hikes. You cannot enforce peace... I think many lessons should have been learnt since 27 years of suffering.

-The third option; it is for Hariri, yes unfortunately the poor Lebanese do not care anymore, they want to hold to any thread of life just to get out of this mud... for them a new person with no history in politics, no experience at all!!!!!!! might be better than any existing personality! This can turn to be a disaster by itself. Bush, Fahed etc... can exert pressure enough.... but must be careful as the other parties have also their connections, and you might force them (if not done already) to resort too to external support from Iran, Russia, Syria etc... However, don't say that Oh! we don't want interferences and the Lebanese must solve their problems themselves!

You need skills to play the game of the Giants! otherwise you might get squashed by mistake!
Seriously now, do you think that Bush cares about Lebanon? Come on now.... do you really think that he has any kind of agenda for Lebanon... you're dreaming your brains out!

The fact of the matter is that: NO ONE CARES ABOUT LEBANON, NO ONE CARES ABOUT US!

Sorry to break it to all of you folks!

So we better start caring about each other as Lebanese, not as Sunnis, Chiite, Christians, or Druze!

Now,
It is worthy to ask oneself, what was the situation before the President elections come to surface? one year ago? Nothing..... the Lebanese people were just again occupied with protesting against each other and opposing MP's in parliaments issuing statements and freezing economy.

It's not that Orange or anything... but let's face it where were all these "balls" when the General was fighting Syrians alone in 89? Everyone was against him, just because of no-balls for saying no!
He chose freedom for Lebanon.... still no one was ready for it.
Today..... every one found their paper-balls and chose to stand against Syria... so be it, we just finished from this issue as Syria is out of Lebanon, so let's get back to life again, get over it, have a life!

We cannot drive everyone we stand against out of Lebanon; It would not be Lebanon otherwise!

If you choose to drive your neighbours out, then they will also do that....

It's civil war again!

You know it, but it seems after 27 years you forgot!!! You need to be reminded? You need to go through it again?

Get ready to pay the price again.

2 comments:

tarr0011 said...

Hi there. You make some interesting points

I am a journalism student at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis and I have to write a story on people from Beirut that come to America to escape the violence.

I was wondering if you, or anyone you know has sought refuge in the U.S.? Have you ever considered coming to the U.S. to get away from the violence? or is it something people just get used to?

Thank you very much for your time.

My email is tarr0011@umn.edu

tarr0011 said...

Hi there. You make some interesting points

I am a journalism student at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis and I have to write a story on people from Beirut that come to America to escape the violence.

I was wondering if you, or anyone you know has sought refuge in the U.S.? Have you ever considered coming to the U.S. to get away from the violence? or is it something people just get used to?

Thank you very much for your time.

My email is tarr0011@umn.edu

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Introducing Lebanon

Coolly combining the ancient with the ultramodern, Lebanon is one of the most captivating countries in the Middle East. From the Phoenician findings of Tyre (Sour) and Roman Baalbek's tremendous temple to Beirut's BO18 and Bernard Khoury's modern movement, the span of Lebanon's history leaves many visitors spinning. Tripoli (Trablous) is considered to have the best souk in the country and is famous for its Mamluk architecture. It's well equipped with a taste of modernity as well; Jounieh, formerly a sleepy fishing village, is a town alive with nightclubs and glitz on summer weekends.

With all of the Middle East's best bits - warm and welcoming people, mind-blowing history and considerable culture, Lebanon is also the antithesis of many people's imaginings of the Middle East: mostly mountainous with skiing to boot, it's also laid-back, liberal and fun. While Beirut is fast becoming the region's party place, Lebanon is working hard to recapture its crown as the 'Paris of the Orient'.

The rejuvenation of the Beirut Central District is one of the largest, most ambitious urban redevelopment projects ever undertaken. Travellers will find the excitement surrounding this and other developments and designs palpable - and very infectious.

Finally, Lebanon's cuisine is considered the richest of the region. From hummus to hommard (lobster), you'll dine like a king. With legendary sights, hospitality, food and nightlife, what more could a traveller want?

Introducing Beirut

What Beirut is depends entirely on where you are. If you’re gazing at the beautifully reconstructed colonial relics and mosques of central Beirut’s Downtown, the city is a triumph of rejuvenation over disaster.

If you’re in the young, vibrant neighbourhoods of Gemmayzeh or Achrafiye, Beirut is about living for the moment: partying, eating and drinking as if there’s no tomorrow. If you’re standing in the shadow of buildings still peppered with bullet holes, or walking the Green Line with an elderly resident, it’s a city of bitter memories and a dark past. If you’re with Beirut’s Armenians, Beirut is about salvation; if you’re with its handful of Jews, it’s about hiding your true identity. Here you’ll find the freest gay scene in the Arab Middle East, yet homosexuality is still illegal. If you’re in one of Beirut’s southern refugee camps, Beirut is about sorrow and displacement; other southern districts are considered a base for paramilitary operations and south Beirut is home to infamous Hezbollah secretary general, Hassan Nasrallah. For some, it’s a city of fear; for others, freedom.

Throw in maniacal drivers, air pollution from old, smoking Mercedes taxis, world-class universities, bars to rival Soho and coffee thicker than mud, political demonstrations, and swimming pools awash with more silicone than Miami. Add people so friendly you’ll swear it can’t be true, a political situation existing on a knife-edge, internationally renowned museums and gallery openings that continue in the face of explosions, assassinations and power cuts, and you’ll find that you’ve never experienced a capital city quite so alive and kicking – despite its frequent volatility.